You can see a galaxy with the naked eye: Astrotourism is an adventure 'you can't experience from photos'

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Astrotourism 101: How to plan your visit to a dark sky destination

Sawtooth Mountain

Grace Lee Kang

Special to USA TODAY

  • There’s been growing interest in dark skies and seeking it out as a destination.
  • You don’t need to go to the most remote corners of the world to see sensational night skies.
  • “Some things you can’t experience from photos or videos or stories,” said one star gazer.

The first time you find yourself under a truly dark night sky is amazing to see how bright the stars shine. And yet some of us have never seen its potential, even if we’ve gone outside at night and it’s been so-called dark. 

The darkest skies in the world are increasingly rare and often difficult to get to because of their remote nature. According to the Department of Energy, 83% of the global population lives under a light-polluted sky. But you don’t need to go to the most remote corners of the world to see sensational night skies.

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