Pictured: One of the first £10 coins celebrating Queen Elizabeth being the longest-reigning monarch

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One of the first ten £10 coins that celebrates Queen Elizabeth II being the longest reigning monarch is being flogged for more than £6,400.

The coin was milled in 2015 as Queen Elizabeth overtook her great-great-grandmother Queen Victoria as having the most time on the throne.

The coin has the five coinage portraits created of the Queen throughout her record 70-year reign. 

Just 180 of the rare coins were minted in the Royal Mint at Llantrisant, near Cardiff.

However, you would not be able to use the coin as it is only commemorative. 

Sam Spiegel, the Director of International Numismatics at Heritage Auctions, said: ‘While modern British coins have been steadily increasing in popularity in recent years, we did see a notable increase since Queen Elizabeth’s passing.

One of the first ten £10 coins that celebrates Queen Elizabeth II being the longest reigning monarch is being flogged for more than £6,400

One of the first ten £10 coins that celebrates Queen Elizabeth II being the longest reigning monarch is being flogged for more than £6,400

The coin was milled in 2015 as Queen Elizabeth overtook her great-great-grandmother Queen Victoria as having the most time on the throne

The coin was milled in 2015 as Queen Elizabeth overtook her great-great-grandmother Queen Victoria as having the most time on the throne  

The coin has the five coinage portraits created of the Queen throughout her record 70-year reign

The coin has the five coinage portraits created of the Queen throughout her record 70-year reign

‘This increase was most noticeable on lower value coins (those less than £1,000), which suggests that the demand is coming from new collectors, outside of traditional numismatic circles, who are primarily looking for a memento or commemorative piece.’

The coin was made of .999 quality gold, with the front, a single portrait of Her Majesty, designed by James Butler MBE RA, who also designed the Queen’s Great Seal of the Realm, which has been in use since 2001.

The reverse, of the Queen’s five coinage portraits from throughout her reign, was created by Stephen Taylor, who has been a designer for the Royal Mint for more than 10 years.

That side also features her Royal Cypher and the words ‘The Longest Reign’.

The five coinage portraits of Her Majesty the Queen Elizabeth II from 1953, 1968, 1985, 1998 and 2015 respectively

The five coinage portraits of Her Majesty the Queen Elizabeth II from 1953, 1968, 1985, 1998 and 2015 respectively

A limited collection was released by the Royal Mint that for the first time ever features two monarchs on one coin. The most expensive item in the Royal Mint's Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II Memorial Coin Collection is a £82,950 gold coin in the'ounce' range weighing 1kg (pictured)

A limited collection was released by the Royal Mint that for the first time ever features two monarchs on one coin. The most expensive item in the Royal Mint ‘s Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II Memorial Coin Collection is a £82,950 gold coin in the ‘ounce’ range weighing 1kg (pictured)

Meanwhile, the legend on the front, translated from Latin, reads: ‘Elizabeth the Second by the Grace of God Queen Defender of the Faith’. 

Sales of commemorative coins have shot up following the death of the Queen last month.

The Royal Mint has also released other coins in the last few weeks, including the first ever coin with two different monarchs of Elizabeth II and Charles III on them. 

Meanwhile, coins with the profile of King Charles III have been unveiled by the Royal Mint – as the 50p is set to go into circulation before Christmas. 

The new £5 Crown

The new £5 Crown

The new £5 Crown is one of three new designs launched by the Royal Mint as part of a Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II Memorial Coin Collection

People will start to see the King’s image in their change from around December, as 50p coins depicting Charles gradually enter circulation to meet demand.

During Her Majesty’s reign, there were five representations of the Queen on coins in circulation, released in 1953, 1968, 1985, 1998 and 2015. 

There have also been commemorative coins, such as for the Queen’s Platinum Jubilee in June.  

The British monarch only started to appear on bank notes in 1960. 

All UK coins bearing the effigy of Queen Elizabeth II will remain legal tender and in active circulation. 

Yet while the Queen’s image faces to the right on current coins, new ones show the King facing left. 

This is due to a tradition dating from the 17th Century to alternate the way successive monarchs are facing. 

The only exception to the tradition has been Edward VIII, who wanted to face left rather than right during his 326-day spell as monarch, the shortest ever for a British monarch, from January 20, 1936, to December 11 of the same year before he abdicated. 

Historically it has been commonplace for coins featuring the effigies of different monarchs to co-circulate, helping to minimise the environmental impact and cost.

The King's effigy has been created by sculptor Martin Jennings, and has been personally approved by Charles

The King’s effigy has been created by sculptor Martin Jennings, and has been personally approved by Charles

In keeping with tradition, the King's portrait faces to the left, the opposite direction to Queen Elizabeth II

In keeping with tradition, the King’s portrait faces to the left, the opposite direction to Queen Elizabeth II

The last coin to break that tradition was Edward VIII's coin (right), which faced left even though the coin for his father George V (left) also did so before him

The last coin to break that tradition was Edward VIII’s coin (right), which faced left even though the coin for his father George V (left) also did so before him

The King's portrait will first appear on a special £5 Crown and 50p commemorating the Queen

The King’s portrait will first appear on a special £5 Crown and 50p commemorating the Queen

There are around 27 billion coins currently circulating in the UK bearing the effigy of Queen Elizabeth II.

These will be replaced over time as they become damaged or worn and to meet demand for additional coins.

Dr Kevin Clancy, director of the Royal Mint Museum, said: ‘Over the coming years it will become common for people to find coins bearing His Majesty and Queen Elizabeth II’s effigy in their change, engaging new generations in the story of Britain’s Royal Family.’

After George VI died, the Queen’s coins did not appear until 1953 – the year after her accession and the year of her coronation.

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