Nick Knowles admits he 'regrets' starring in Shreddies ad which saw him dropped from DIY SOS

10 mins read

[ad_1]

Nick Knowles has spoken out on his breach of BBC commercial guidelines.

Last year, the TV star was dropped from a special edition of his hit BBC show of 23 years DIY SOS after starring in an advert for cereal brand Shreddies, which went against the broadcaster’s advertising rules.

Speaking about the incident, Nick admitted that while he regrets the ‘confusion’ he caused with the ad, he took the job to make money during the pandemic.  

Back on screens: Nick Knowles has spoken out on his breach of BBC commercial guidelines for the first time. The star was dropped from a special edition of his hit BBC show DIY SOS last year after starring in an advert for cereal brand Shreddies

Back on screens: Nick Knowles has spoken out on his breach of BBC commercial guidelines for the first time. The star was dropped from a special edition of his hit BBC show DIY SOS last year after starring in an advert for cereal brand Shreddies

Nick was replaced by comic Rhod Gilbert for the Children In Need special of DIY SOS at the height of the drama but is returning to present a new series of the home makeover programme, which will air on the BBC next week.  

Nick played a jobbing builder in the advert – a move said to go against the BBC’s ban on TV talent trading-off their on-screen personas. 

Nick told The Sun of his decision to star in the ad: ‘You know, you’ve gotta earn and there was a period during the pandemic where shows just weren’t being made. That work wasn’t there and I’ve got to provide for my family and an opportunity came up.

‘Obviously what I regret is the confusion that arose around it. I certainly would not have chosen to have upset the BBC or upset the programme in any way.’

Rules: Speaking about the incident, Nick admitted that while he regrets the'confusion' he caused with the ad, he took the job to make money during the pandemic (pictured on DIY SOS)

Rules: Speaking about the incident, Nick admitted that while he regrets the ‘confusion’ he caused with the ad, he took the job to make money during the pandemic (pictured on DIY SOS)

Nick added that DIY SOS is ‘more important that just a job for me. I live and breathe it and have done for 23 years. It’s really, really important to me. ‘I’m just glad we were all able to sit down and work a way through it.’

The BBC star confirmed in May 2021 that he wouldn’t be sacked from DIY SOS over the ad with the corporation making a U-turn on their stance.

Nick told The Sun: ‘I have always said that DIY SOS is more than just a presenting job for me, it’s part of me.

‘It has my heart and working for the BBC for over 22 years is something I have never taken for granted.

Issues: Nick played a jobbing builder in the advert - a move said to go against the BBC's ban on TV talent trading-off their on-screen personas

Issues: Nick played a jobbing builder in the advert – a move said to go against the BBC’s ban on TV talent trading-off their on-screen personas

‘I will continue filming new episodes of DIY SOS over the coming months and will be back on your screens with the purple shirts next year.’

Fans of the presenter, who once netted as much as £300,000 in one year from his BBC work, took to social media to defend the star at the time.

Some even branded the BBC as ‘inconsistent’ for coming down on Knowles while allowing Match of the Day host Gary Lineker to continue advertising Walkers crisps. 

One Twitter user said: ‘This is ridiculous. What’s the difference between Gary Lineker selling Walkers Crisps? Very inconsistent policy?’  

Defence: Fans of the presenter, who once netted as much as £300,000 in one year from his BBC work, took to social media to defend the star at the time

Defence: Fans of the presenter, who once netted as much as £300,000 in one year from his BBC work, took to social media to defend the star at the time

The section of BBC policy that Nick Knowles was suspected of falling foul of 

References to BBC Content in Advertisements

15.3.40: Advertisements or promotions involving talent should not imitate, suggest a reference or connection to or ‘pass off’ BBC content, for example, by replicating any editorial elements of a programme, such as characters, logos, titles, channel names or music or graphics associated with the programme, or by using or directly imitating sets or key venues, catchphrases or format points from the content.

Advertisements should not replicate or ‘pass off’ the role the talent plays in the programme. There should not be use of more than one member of BBC talent from the same programme in any advertisement for a non-BBC-related product. It is unlikely to be acceptable for several members of talent from different BBC programmes to appear in the same advertisement.

The advertisement should not bring the BBC into disrepute. 

Another said: ‘If you think Nick Knowles has broken rules flogging Shreddies, as you sacking Mr Lineker for the Walkers ads?

 

‘I know which one is more watchable and does more good!’ 

One Twitter user added: ‘The BBC are happy to allow an overpaid Gary Lineker to post his boring sanctimonious opinions on social media, but let’s boot out Nick Knowles for doing a Shreddies advert.’ 

During crunch Zoom meeting Nick was told by corporation bosses that he would have to get the ad taken off air or quit the show that helped launched his career.

MailOnline understands that the issue is the similarity between Knowles’ character in the advert and his role as the presenter of DIY SOS – and whether it breaches a rule banning stars from replicating their BBC roles in commercials. 

The broadcaster’s strict rules state that any promotions involving on-screen talent should not ‘imitate, suggest a reference or connection to or ‘pass off’ BBC content’.   

Knowles has hosted DIY SOS since 1999.

The show, which is produced by the BBC, sees a team of builders and volunteers transform a person’s home. 

The person is nominated by their friends and family.

Knowles was listed as earning between £300,000 and £349,999 at the BBC in 2016-17, dropping to £230,000-£239,999 the following year.

However he wasn’t listed in reports for the following two years, indicating Knowles earned less than the £150,000 threshold at which his pay is published. 

Popular: Knowles has hosted DIY SOS since 1999. The show, which is produced by the BBC, sees a team of builders and volunteers transform a person's home (Nick pictured with the DIY SOS team in 2008)

Popular: Knowles has hosted DIY SOS since 1999. The show, which is produced by the BBC, sees a team of builders and volunteers transform a person’s home (Nick pictured with the DIY SOS team in 2008) 

Shreddies have not revealed how much Knowles was paid for the add, but one expert told MailOnline it could be in the region of £200,000.

In the advert, Nick plays a builder who pours a bowl of the cereal into his hat, while calling himself ‘Nick get it done Knowles’. 

But the BBC has strict rules for on-screen stars when taking part in on-screen advertising.

One rule bans stars from imitating BBC products.

Under the heading ‘References to BBC Content in Advertisements’, it says: ‘Advertisements or promotions involving talent should not imitate, suggest a reference or connection to or ‘pass off’ BBC content, for example, by replicating any editorial elements of a programme, such as characters, logos, titles, channel names or music or graphics associated with the programme, or by using or directly imitating sets or key venues, catchphrases or format points from the content.’

It also adds: ‘The BBC does not seek to place unnecessary or unreasonable restrictions on talent, whether on-air talent or other production talent.

‘However, promotional activity, which includes commercial advertising and endorsements, must not risk damaging the integrity of the BBC content they are associated with, or risk damaging the BBC’s reputation generally. 

‘Nor should those activities undermine the personal reputation of the individual.

‘Promotional work must not suggest BBC endorsement, compromise the BBC’s values, bring the BBC into disrepute, or give the public reason to doubt the impartiality or integrity of BBC on-air talent.’

The BBC has not revealed the sticking point over Nick’s advert. 

[ad_2]

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Latest from Blog