Gary Beadle's wife Emma McVey reveals she was skinny-shamed due to her secret medical condition

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‘My bones were sticking out, I looked disgusting’: Gary Beadle’s wife Emma McVey reveals she was skinny-shamed due to her secret medical condition

Emma McVey has revealed she was skinny-shamed due to a medical condition that she hid from everyone, including her husband Gary Beadle.

The model, 29, was suffering from undiagnosed ulcerative colitis, a chronic inflammatory bowel disease, when she married former Geordie Shore star Gaz, 34, in June last year.

Emma, who was also awaiting heart surgery, admitted that she was secretly suffering from abdominal cramps and bleeding on her wedding day. 

'My bones were sticking out, I looked disgusting': Gaz Beadle's wife Emma McVey, 29, has revealed she was skinny-shamed due to her secret medical condition, on Sunday

‘My bones were sticking out, I looked disgusting’: Gaz Beadle’s wife Emma McVey, 29, has revealed she was skinny-shamed due to her secret medical condition, on Sunday

In an interview with The Sun she explained: ‘With the wedding approaching, I tried to put it to the back of my mind. I didn’t confide in Gary as I didn’t want to worry him.’

The influencer explained how the exhaustion had her in bed by 10pm on the day, but she believed that was a symptom of her heart condition.  

She continued: ‘I let it get really bad. My bones were sticking out, I looked disgusting and I had no energy.’  

‘People on social media were saying, “You need to gain weight,” and, “Just eat!” I’ve not been trying to lose weight to look a certain way, it’s because of a medical problem.’ 

Symptoms: She explained:'With the wedding approaching, I tried to put it to the back of my mind. I didn’t confide in Gary as I didn’t want to worry him' (Pictured in March)

Symptoms: She explained: ‘With the wedding approaching, I tried to put it to the back of my mind. I didn’t confide in Gary as I didn’t want to worry him’ (Pictured in March)

Emma, who shares Chester, four, and Primrose, two, with Gary, finally went to her doctor in August but it wasn’t until she was admitted to A&E that she was diagnosed with the condition. 

She said that she believed the condition was brought on by the stress from finding out she needed heart surgery, having the wedding and moving house, all in a short period of time. 

Emma diagnosed with three holes in her heart, just before the couples wedding day in July last year. 

Family: Emma, who shares Chester, four, and Primrose, two, with Gary, says it wasn't until she was admitted to A&E that she was diagnosed with ulcerative colitis (Pictured in February)

Family: Emma, who shares Chester, four, and Primrose, two, with Gary, says it wasn’t until she was admitted to A&E that she was diagnosed with ulcerative colitis (Pictured in February) 

She was set to undergo surgery the following November, which has been postponed due to the medication for her ulcerative colitis.    

Updating her followers at the time, Emma wrote: ‘Long story short, we’ve finally found out I have three large holes in my heart and damaged tissue which is causing my blood to pass through the wrong direction… 

‘The right side of my heart is now enlarged and weak, along with high blood pressure in my lungs.

Poorly: Emma was also diagnosed with three holes in her heart, just before the couples wedding day in July last year

Poorly: Emma was also diagnosed with three holes in her heart, just before the couples wedding day in July last year

She continued: ‘This has all got a lot worse as they should of been closed when I was a child, unfortunately no one checked my heart even when I had seizures and diagnosed with epilepsy or fainted like it was a hobby. 

‘I definitely shouldn’t of carried babies whilst they were there. They are baffled how I actually made it through birth with Primrose and if it wasn’t a cesarean it could of been a very different story.

‘Now I’m waiting for open heart surgery as the holes just can’t be closed with device closure.’  

What is ulcerative colitis?

Ulcerative colitis is inflammation of the lower end of your digestive system, including your large bowel and rectum.

Common symptoms of ulcerative colitis include frequent diarrhoea (which may be bloody), stomach aches and needing to go to the toilet a lot.

Ulcerative colitis is usually treated with medicines that reduce the inflammation in your digestive system. Surgery may be needed in severe cases.

It’s not clear what causes ulcerative colitis. A possible cause is your immune system attacking your digestive system.

Source: NHS  

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