Dominique Elissa is 10 times more likely to get skin cancer again after freckle removal

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An Australian model who had a cancerous freckle cut out of the bottom of her foot has updated fans on her doctors’ dire warning: She’s ten times more likely to get another skin cancer now.

Dominique Elissa, 26, who is often spotted on Sydney’s most famous Bondi Beach to Bronte coastal walk of a morning, had a freckle cut out of her skin on Tuesday last week after doctors’ highlighted its abnormalities. 

Today she told her 230,000 followers on Instagram that a biopsy concluded the freckle was ‘pre-cancerous’ – the earliest stage of a skin cancer legion – and if it had been left, could have been deadly. 

Today she told her 230,000 followers on Instagram that a biopsy concluded the freckle was'pre-cancerous' - the earliest stage of a skin cancer legion - and if it had been left, could have been deadly

Today she told her 230,000 followers on Instagram that a biopsy concluded the freckle was ‘pre-cancerous’ – the earliest stage of a skin cancer legion – and if it had been left, could have been deadly

‘So many of you have asked about my results from the biopsy. It has warmed my heart to get your messages,’ she said.

‘I got the results today and it was pre-cancerous, which means that if it was left it would have turned into cancer. Thank goodness I caught it early. The incision took it all out.

‘Now I have to go every six months for a check. They said my chances of getting skin cancer have gone up 10 times which is really frightening. It means i’m going to be so sun safe and be super careful.’ 

'So many of you have asked about my results from the biopsy. It has warmed my heart to get your messages,' she said

‘So many of you have asked about my results from the biopsy. It has warmed my heart to get your messages,’ she said

About 60 percent of people who have had one skin cancer in their life will be diagnosed with a second one within 10 years, a 2015 study by JAMA Dermatology reported.  

Dominique shared a photo of the tiny, cancerous mole doctors found underneath her foot after a skin check last week.

 ‘So I put on my Instagram Story that I can’t train strenuously for the next three weeks… the reason for this is that about two weeks ago I got my skin checked and they checked all my spots,’ she said at the time.

Dominique Elissa, 26, who is often spotted on Sydney's most famous Bondi Beach to Bronte coastal walk of a morning, had a freckle cut out of her skin on Tuesday after doctors' highlighted its abnormalities

Dominique Elissa, 26, who is often spotted on Sydney’s most famous Bondi Beach to Bronte coastal walk of a morning, had a freckle cut out of her skin on Tuesday after doctors’ highlighted its abnormalities

‘They were all fine and then there was the tiniest one under my foot. Honestly it was the size of a little freckle like that and it was of concern,’ she explained, pointing to a mark on her forearm.

‘So yesterday they had to remove it. I had to get two stitches so I can’t walk properly for three weeks. I can’t do intense training which yes, is an inconvenience for me.

‘However, I’m so grateful that I caught it early and I’ll get my results in a week. I just wanted to say, go and get your skin checked. Wear sunscreen on your hands and under your feet.

‘Just be careful in the sun because it’s not worth it at the end of the day.’ 

While the young model doesn't yet know what type of early stage cancer it could be, it has certainly been a stark reminder of how powerful the sun is Down Under

This is the size of the mole that was on her foot

While the young model doesn’t yet know what type of early stage cancer it could be, it has certainly been a stark reminder of how powerful the sun is Down Under (pictured showing the size of the spot)

It has certainly been a stark reminder for the young model about how powerful the sun is Down Under 

Melanoma is the most common cancer for the 20 to 39 age group to get in Australia, partly because of our outdoor lifestyle and harsh climate. 

It happens after the DNA in skin cells is damaged (typically due to harmful UV rays) and then not repaired so it triggers mutations that can form malignant tumours. 

Dominique isn’t the only woman who has opened up about their brush with cancer.

Melanoma is the most common cancer for the 20 to 39 age group to get in Australia, partly because of our outdoor lifestyle and harsh climate

A lifestyle blogger who lost her father to melanoma in 2019 issued a warning about the deadly disease after finding a tiny cancerous spot on her own leg a year later.

Louise Hay visited Bondi Junction’s Skin Cancer Clinic in Sydney for a routine check of her moles only to be told that one very insignificant-looking freckle was actually a dangerous cancer.

‘This time last year I lost my dad to melanoma, so ever since then I’ve been super vigilant about getting my skin checked,’ she said in an Instagram Story at the time.

‘Last week was my one year check up and they found a little mole on my leg which they removed and sent off to get checked, to find out what it was, and yesterday I found out it was a melanoma.’ 

Louise Hay visited Bondi Junction's Skin Cancer Clinic in Sydney three months ago for a routine check of her moles only to be told that one very insignificant-looking freckle was actually a dangerous cancer

Louise Hay visited Bondi Junction’s Skin Cancer Clinic in Sydney three months ago for a routine check of her moles only to be told that one very insignificant-looking freckle was actually a dangerous cancer

Louise was told the spot was graded a'stage zero', meaning it's just on the surface of her skin and can easily be removed. She had caught it early (pictured)

Louise was told the spot was graded a ‘stage zero’, meaning it’s just on the surface of her skin and can easily be removed. She had caught it early (pictured)

Louise was told the spot was graded a ‘stage zero’, meaning it’s just on the surface of her skin and can easily be removed. She had caught it early. 

‘This is great, they can just cut it out and it will be fine. I just got it removed today. I just wanted to take this opportunity to remind everyone to get their skin checked,’ she said. 

‘I never would have thought it would happen to me until my dad was diagnosed and it’s crazy to think I would never have gone for a skin check and found the melanoma that I did had my dad not gotten sick.’

Louise’s father Donald Hay, who built the company Hayco into one of the world’s largest brush makers, died on July 17 from melanoma at the age of 76.

Louise's father Donald Hay (pictured with his daughter), who built the company Hayco into one of the world's largest brush makers, died on July 17 from melanoma at the age of 76

Louise’s father Donald Hay (pictured with his daughter), who built the company Hayco into one of the world’s largest brush makers, died on July 17 from melanoma at the age of 76

Louise shared the cut doctors had to make in her leg to remove the freckle on Instagram

 Louise shared the cut doctors had to make in her leg to remove the freckle on Instagram

His daughter believes he is still ‘looking after me’ from ‘up there’ after her own brush with cancer became a story of survival and awareness. 

On her social media page Louise posted an image of what the mole looked like on June 5, and later, the large cut doctors had to make to remove it. 

‘I know everyone thinks they are invincible and it’ll never happen to them but… just go and get your skin checked. Put a date in the diary once a year with your girlfriends,’ she said.

After posting the images the Sydney socialite was inundated with messages of gratitude, with many of her followers booking in their own skin checks as a result.  

‘So many of you have gone and booked skin checks,’ she acknowledged in a separate post. 

‘This was my annual check up… where they found the mole that looked funny. I didn’t see that there was anything wrong with that mole, it just looked like a freckle to me, honestly it was so small. It looked completely normal.’

Louise encouraged her fans to follow the page Call Time On Melanoma, which works to dispel some of the myths about sun protection and how much sunscreen you need to apply to be safe. 

She encouraged her fans to follow the page Call Time On Melanoma , which works to dispel some of the myths about sun protection and how much sunscreen you need to apply to be safe

'So many of you have gone and booked skin checks,' she acknowledged in a separate post

She encouraged her fans to follow the page Call Time On Melanoma , which works to dispel some of the myths about sun protection and how much sunscreen you need to apply to be safe

While most people believe the hole in the ozone layer above Australia is the sole cause of our high rates, it’s actually got more to do with migration.

Most Australians have the wrong type of skin for their environment. Our country has been populated by people with fairer skin types whose ancestors come from much less sunny climates, like the United Kingdom.

Having less protective pigmentation leaves our skin cells vulnerable to the DNA-damaging rays from the sun, cancerwa reported.



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