Davina McCall reveals how she thought her menopause symptoms were a 'brain tumour'

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Davina McCall says she feared she had a ‘brain tumour or Alzheimer’s’ after menopause symptoms caused her to make a mistake on TV – and admits she felt ‘aged’ and ’embarrassed’

  • Davina McCall, 54, opened up about severe menopause symptoms on BBC One
  • Said a TV blunder caused by brain fog let her in tears, as she feared the worst 
  • She admitted she thought she was suffering from a brain tumour or Alzheimer’s

Davina McCall has opened up about how her severe menopause symptoms left her feeling like she had a ‘brain tumour or Alzheimer’s’ following a mistake on TV.

Speaking from Tunbridge Wells, the presenter, 54, told Sophie Raworth on today’s Sunday Morning on BBC One, that her menopause ‘aged’ her and left her feeling ’embarrassed’ and ‘irrelevant’.

Davina, who recently penned a book on the matter, titled Menopausing, said the brain fog she experienced during peri-menopause led her to make a mistake in her job. 

She revealed that during a particularly vulnerable moment, she burst into tears, thinking she was suffering from ‘a brain tumour or Alzheimer’s or something’.

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Davina McCall, 54, has opened up about her severe menopause symptoms and how they made her fear she had a brain tumour or dementia. She told Sophie Raworth on today's Sunday Morning on BBC One, that her menopause'aged' her and left her feeling'embarrassed'

Davina McCall, 54, has opened up about her severe menopause symptoms and how they made her fear she had a brain tumour or dementia. She told Sophie Raworth on today’s Sunday Morning on BBC One, that her menopause ‘aged’ her and left her feeling ’embarrassed’

Davina (pictured), who recently penned a book on the matter, titled Menopausing, said the brain fog she experienced during peri-menopause led her to make a mistake in her job

Davina (pictured), who recently penned a book on the matter, titled Menopausing, said the brain fog she experienced during peri-menopause led her to make a mistake in her job

‘During peri-menopause, the hormones go up and down and up and down, so you think you’re going completely mad,’ Davina said. 

‘I felt it aged me, I felt it would make me irrelevant, I felt embarrassed because I’d always felt at the top of my game, 

‘I’d been in television at that point for 20 years, I really knew what I was doing, I was extremely proud of my kind of list-making and my logistical practicality and the fact that I could multitask,’ she said.

But Davina revealed her skills were hindered by menopause as she recalled making a mistake on TV. 

‘Somebody asked me if I was okay because I messed up on a TV programme, and I said yes, and when she shut the door and went away, I just burst into tears,’ she told Sophie. 

She revealed that during a particularly vulnerable moment, she burst into tears, thinking she was suffering from'a brain tumour or Alzheimer's or something'

She revealed that during a particularly vulnerable moment, she burst into tears, thinking she was suffering from ‘a brain tumour or Alzheimer’s or something’

‘Because I thought “I’m not okay, I think I got a brain tumour, or I got Alzheimer’s or something, help me”,’ the presenter added. 

Writing for the Mail on Sunday today, Davina spoke more of her symptoms as she discussed the ongoing shortage of HRT – Hormone Replacement Therapy – which women use to manage their menopause symptoms. 

‘I started with symptoms around ten years ago after suffering brain fog and anxiety to the extent I thought I was losing my mind,’ she said. 

‘In my mid-40s, I was considered by my doctor to be too young to be menopausal, so I took the decision to consult a gynaecologist,’ she added. 

Alongside Penny Lancaster and Mariella Frostrup, and MP Carolyn Harris, Davina is campaigning to change the law around HRT prescription for women

Alongside Penny Lancaster and Mariella Frostrup, and MP Carolyn Harris, Davina is campaigning to change the law around HRT prescription for women 

‘They put me on HRT patches which give me much needed oestrogen – the hormone whose rapid depletion in menopause causes so many of our problems – and a coil which gives me progesterone by way of balance.

‘I felt better almost instantly and have been vocal ever since about the fact that I intend to take HRT until the day I die,’ she said. 

The supply crisis has seen major shortages of some HRT products, which are used by approximately 1 million women in the UK.

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