Dan Murphy's: How long wine lasts once opened – and how to make it last longer

4 mins read


How long each type of wine can REALLY last once opened – and the best ways to keep it tasting fresh

  • A wine merchant has shared how long wine lasts after opening the bottle
  • Sean Menzes said oxidation takes place as oxygen interacts with the wine 
  • The type of wine, how it’s store and the amount in the bottle are all key factors

A wine merchant has revealed how long different drops last once opened – and how to make each stay fresh a little longer. 

Sean Menzes, from Australia, said when a wine bottle is cracked open oxidation begins to take place – a chemical reaction in which the wine is exposed to oxygen.

The amount of time the alcohol will last is dependent on the type of wine, how it’s stored and how much is left in the bottle.

Wine merchant Sean Menzes said when a wine bottle is cracked open oxidation begins to take place - a chemical reaction in which the wine is exposed to oxygen. The amount of time the alcohol will last is dependent on the type of wine, how it's stored and how much is left in the bottle (stock image)

Wine merchant Sean Menzes said when a wine bottle is cracked open oxidation begins to take place – a chemical reaction in which the wine is exposed to oxygen. The amount of time the alcohol will last is dependent on the type of wine, how it’s stored and how much is left in the bottle (stock image)

Mr Menzes told Australian alcohol retailer Dan Murphy’s an open bottle of white wine or rosé will last between three and five days if kept cool in the fridge. 

Sparkling wine will only last one to two days once opened, so it’s best to invest in a good quality bottle stopper or enjoy a bottle with others. 

In winter, opened bottles of red wine will last between four and five days, but in summer due to the heat it’ll last two to three days. 

It’s also recommended to store red wine in a dark place regardless if it’s open or closed.

How long does an open wine bottle last?

White wine and rosé – 3-5 days if kept refrigerated 

Sparkling wine – 1-2 days, perhaps 3 if a bottle stopper is used 

Red wine – 4-5 days in winter or 2-3 days in summer 

Source: Dan Murphy’s

Luckily, there are a number of ways to make your leftover wine last longer. 

The age-old trick of placing a teaspoon in the neck of open bottle of wine won’t do much, so Mr Menzes recommends buying a bottle stopper.

If you only have a glass or two left in a 750mL bottle, perhaps transfer it into a smaller bottle. 

This will decrease the surface area and amount of air inside the bottle to slow down the oxidation process.

How to make an open wine bottle last longer

Invest in a good quality bottle stopper to prevent oxygen interfering with the wine 

The age-old hack of putting a teaspoon in an open bottle likely won’t do much for sparkling wine. So opt for a sparkling stopper 

Transfer leftover wine into a smaller bottle to reduce the surface area and amount of air in the bottle 

Source: Dan Murphy’s

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